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The Port of Toronto, one of Canada's largest major inland ports, is situated on the northwest shore of Lake Ontario. Located minutes from Toronto’s downtown core, the Port of Toronto has served as Toronto’s gateway to the St. Lawrence Seaway and to marine ports around the world since 1793.

Serving primarily as a bulk cargo destination, the port boasts a seamless network of cost-effective intermodal links to road, rail and air transportation, serving as a unique and crucial piece of the city’s economic infrastructure. In addition to moving cargo, the Port also welcomes cruise ships and passengers from around the globe through the Cruise Ship Terminal.

In addition to its economic impact, imports through the port have a positive impact on the environment and traffic congestion. In 2017 approximately 54,000 40-tonne trucks were taken off Toronto's already congested roads and highways through cargo being moved by ship. The Port of Toronto is a vital connection to the world, not only boosting tourism and trade, but also helping to lower Toronto’s carbon footprint.
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Great Lakes-St. Lawrence shipping adds 180,000 jobs, $26 billion to Canadian economy: New Study

Cargo shipments to ports on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River waterway generate CDN$60 billion worth of economic activity and 328,500 jobs in Canada and the U.S., according to a new study released in July 2018. That breaks down to 181,000 jobs and CDN$26 billion in economic activity in Ontario and Quebec.

The Economic Impacts of Maritime Shipping in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region reveals the economic benefits of the shipping activity along the entire bi-national Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River waterway – the longest deep draft inland navigation system in the world. In 2017, more than 230 million metric tons of raw materials and finished goods were transported by ships to and from ports via the waterway, which includes the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence Seaway and the lower St. Lawrence river. This international and domestic cargo was worth over CDN$100 billion.

To learn more about the study click here .

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A Power Vessel Operator’s Permit is required to operate a powered vessel in the Port and Harbour of Toronto.

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Boaters Notice

PortsToronto is responsible for keeping the Toronto Harbour safe and navigable. See Boater’s Notices about everything from swimming in the harbour to obtaining permission for a marine event.

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